Low Level Laser
Therapy (Cold Laser)


Since the inception of cold lasers in 1960, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been utilized in many studies to determine the efficacy and scope of treatment for which lasers can be used. Cold Laser Therapy has shown increases mitochondria production in cells, helping to decrease inflammation and increase healthy cellular activity. When the cold laser is utilized as a transcranial (through the skull) therapy we see an increase in brain activation to the targeted areas.

LLLT uses low-powered laser light in the range of 1-1000 mW, at wavelengths from 632-1064 nm, to stimulate a biological response. These lasers emit no heat, sound, or vibration. Instead of generating a thermal effect, LLLT acts by inducing a photochemical reaction in the cell, a process referred to as biostimulation or photobiomodulation. Photobiology works on the principle that, when the light hits certain molecules called chromophores, the photon energy causes electrons to be excited and jump from low-energy orbits to higher-energy orbits. In nature, this stored energy can be used by the system to perform various cellular tasks, such as photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis.”

Research

Low-level light therapy for enhancement of neurologic function

Role of Low-Level Laser Therapy in Neurorehabilitation

APPLICATION OF LOW REACTIVE-LEVEL LASER THERAPY (LLLT) IN THE FUNCTIONAL TRAINING OF CEREBRAL PALSY PATIENTS

Reduced axonal transport in Parkinson’s disease cybrid neurites is restored by light therapy

Low-level laser therapy ameliorates disease progression in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis